Setting up a “robust” Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi

My kids are gamers, and they love Minecraft. Minecraft sells its client software, but the server software is freely available. Since it is written in Java, it can run easily on Linux. Meanwhile, you can order neat little Raspberry Pi Linux computers for less than $50. So, putting two and two together, you can build cheaply a little box (not much bigger than my hand) that can be used as a permanent, low-power, perfectly silent game server. And you can expose your kids to servers, Linux and so forth.

There are many guides to setting up a Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi, but the information is all over the place, and often obsolete. So I thought I would contribute my own technical guide. It took me a couple of long evenings to set things up, but if you follow my instructions, you can probably get it done in a couple of hours, once you have assembled all the material.

My instructions have been tested thoroughly and they work. I recommend you pay close attention to each step.

You can take liberties and improvise, but if you do so, please understand that you are likely on your own to fix the problems you create.


  • You need a working computer connected to the Internet. My instructions work whether you have a Mac, a Windows PC or a Linux box.
  • You need to buy a Raspberry Pi. I recommend getting either a Raspberry Pi 2 or a Raspberry Pi 3. I tried long and hard to get a stable and fast server running on a first-generation Raspberry Pi, but it was not good. I find that the Raspberry Pi 3 is much better than the Raspberry Pi 2, unsurprisingly, so it is recommended first.
    • You need a power cord to go with it.
    • Moreover, you need a micro SD card. I recommend getting, at least, an 8GB card. Given how cheap cards are, you might as well get a larger card so that you do not ever have to worry about running out of space. I recommend getting the fastest card you can find. (Speed is normally indicated as a number, such as 5 or 10. Higher numbers are better.) For good measure, get several cards.
    • I recommend getting a nice plastic box to enclose your Raspberry Pi, just so that it is prettier and sturdier.
    • You might also need an ethernet cable if you do not have one already. If you are going to use the Raspberry Pi, it is best to connect it directly to your router: wifi is slower, more troublesome and less scalable. I have had no end of trouble trying to run a Raspberry Pi server using wifi: I don’t know whether it is possible.
    • An HDMI cable, an HDMI-compatible monitor or TV, a USB keyboard and a USB mouse are also be required at first.


  • You need to put the latest version of the Linux distribution for Raspberry Pi, Raspbian on the SD card. My instructions assume that you get the full version. For some reason, many people prefer the “lite” version, but they also seem to encounter more problems. Please use the full version (the lite and the full versions are both free). If you have an old version of the operating system, do not try to upgrade it unnecessarily. Starting from a fresh version is best. Simply follow the instructions from the Raspberry Pi website. Downloading the image files takes forever.
  • At first, you will need a monitor or a TV (with an HDMI connection), a keyboard and a mouse connected to the Raspberry Pi. Connect your Raspberry Pi to your router through the ethernet cable. Put the SD card in the Raspberry Pi. Do so with some care as you can easily damage the SD card or the Raspberry Pi by pushing the card at the wrong angle or with too much strength. Plug the monitor, the keyboard, and the mouse. Plug the power in and it should start. If, like it happened to me, the card won’t stay plugged in, just use a rubber band.
  • The Raspberry Pi will launch in a graphical mode with mouse support and everything you expect from a modern operating system: we will soon get rid of this unnecessary luxury. Hopefully, you have Internet access right away. Because I am assuming that you are using an ethernet cable (as opposed to wifi), there should be no configuration needed for Internet access.
  • By default your username is “pi” on this new Raspberry Pi. Do not change it even if you know how. If you do so, you will need to update all the instructions: you are on your own.
  • Go to the terminal. On a Raspberry Pi with a graphical desktop, it can sometimes be found on the Desktop itself maybe under the name LXTERMINAL. You should be able to find it quickly by navigating through the graphical desktop and looking the icons. In a shell, you type commands followed by the enter key. Try typing pwd, it should return /home/pi. If so, congratulations! You are on your way to become a Linux hacker!
  • (Optional) It helps to know that files in a modern computer are organized in directories (sometimes called folders). Directories can contain other directories, and so forth. On a Raspberry Pi, by default, you have a home directory located at /home/pi. You can create new directories under this home directory. You generally cannot write to files located outside your home directory and its subdirectories, nor can you create new directories everywhere: to do so, you need to invoke administrative privileges which is done by prefixing your commands by the sudo instruction. However, you should only use the sudo when it is strictly necessary as it is a security risk and it affects the file and directory permissions. It might help if you are familiar with the following shell commands:
    • pwd: gives you the current (working directory).
    • echo $HOME: gives you the location of your home directory (this should be /home/pi throughout.
    • cd newdirectory: changes the current directory to newdirectory if it exists.
    • mkdir newdirectory: creates a new directory called newdirectory under the current directory.
    • ls: displays all files and directories in the current directory.
    • cd ..: changes the current directory to the parent directory.
    • rm myfile: permanently deletes the file called myfile.
    • cp myfile1 myfile2: creates a new file called myfile2 which has the same content as myfile1.
    • mv myfile1 myfile2: moves or renames the file myfile1 to myfile1.
  • Install a couple of extra packages: sudo apt-get install netatalk screen. Do not skip this important step as we need screen.
  • Then type sudo raspi-config. This command starts a little configuration tool. First, tell it to expand the file system so that it uses all the SD card. For safety, I recommend changing the default password (the basic account is called pi with password raspberry). You want to tell the Raspberry Pi to boot in the shell: Console Autologin Text console, automatically logged in as 'pi' user. In Internationalisation Options, you want to configure the time and locale. You may want to set the overclocking to the maximum setting, if the option is available. (Overclocking is optional and may cause instabilities and crashes.) You want to assign the minimum amount of memory to the GPU (16 is enough) from Advanced Options. Under the advanced options, you may want to check the Hostname value (it defaults to raspberrypi, I assume you are not changing it). Make sure that the ssh server is on. You can exit raspi-config which should bring you back to the bash shell. Reboot the Raspberry Pi by typing sudo reboot in the bash shell.
  • From your PC or Mac on the same network, you need to connect by ssh to pi@raspberrypi.local.
    On a Mac, just go to Terminal and type ssh pi@raspberrypi.local.
    If you are using Windows, you can access your Raspberry Pi via ssh by using Putty. (If you have Windows 10, Microsoft makes available a Linux subsystem with full support for ssh.) You should now be in the bash shell on the Raspberry Pi. Once this work, you can unplug the Raspberry Pi from the monitor, the keyboard and the mouse. Your server is now “headless”.
  • From your home directory, create a directory where you will install the Minecraft files: mkdir minecraft && cd minecraft. You can install your files elsewhere, but you need to adapt the instructions below accordingly.
  • Download the build file for Spigot (your chosen Minecraft software):

  • Build the server: java -jar BuildTools.jar. This will take forever. Go drink coffee. After a long time, in my case, it created a file called spigot-1.9.jar as well as many other files. Type ls spigot*.jar to find how the jar files is called, I will assume that you have spigot-1.9.jar. Adapt the instructions below according to the actual name of the file.
  • Once this is done, start the server for the first time: java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.9.jar nogui. This will create a file called eula.txt. You need to edit it with the command nano eula.txt. Make sure it reads eula=true.
  • Start the server a second time: java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.9.jar nogui. It will take forever again. Go drink more coffee. Once the server return the command prompt, it should be operational. Have a Minecraft player connect to raspberrypi.local. Once you have verified that everything works, type stop.
  • We are going to create a convenient script to start the server. Type nano and write the following:
    if ! screen -list | grep -q "minecraft"; then
      cd /home/pi/minecraft
      while true; do
        screen -S minecraft -d -m java -jar  -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.9.jar nogui  && break

    The if clause helps to make sure that only one instance runs at any one time (it is not perfect, but should be good enough). The while clause helps to make sure that the server restarts if it crashes unexpectedly. (This should not be necessary, in theory, but Minecraft servers do crash in practice.) Make the script executable: chmod +x
    You did remember that I am assuming that you have a file called spigot-1.9.jar, right? If your file name differs, please adapt the script accordingly.

  • To make the server more stable, type nano spigot.yml. Set view-distance: 5. This may or may not be necessary, you can experiment. The downside of this setting is that the clients will get a more limited view.
  • Optionally, you may want to type nano and modify the greeting message given by the motd variable.
  • We want the server to start automatically when the Raspberry Pi reboots, so type sudo nano /etc/rc.local and enter su -l pi -c /home/pi/minecraft/ right before the exit command.
  • Start the server again using the script: ./ It will return you to the shell. To access the console of the server type screen -r minecraft, to return to the shell type ctrl-a d. At any point, you can now disconnect from the server. The server is still running. You do not need to remain connected to the Raspberry Pi.
  • Spigot makes use of temporary files (located in /tmp). This can cause performance issues and instabilities on a Raspberry Pi. It might be better to have temporary files reside in memory. To alleviate the problem, open the file /etc/default/tmpfs with a text editor such as nano (e.g., type sudo nano /etc/default/tmpfs) and insert a line with the following text “RAMTMP=yes“, while making sure that there is no other line with the string RAMTMP=. For this change to take effect, I recommend simply stopping the Minecraft server, by going to the server prompt (type screen -r minecraft if needed) and then typing stop. Then you can safely reboot the Raspberry Pi (e.g., with the reboot command). If you have done everything right, the server should automatically start following a reboot sequence.
  • You are done, congratulations!

And voilà! The result is a “robust” and low-cost Minecraft server.

If you ever need to stop the server, just log in with ssh, use screen -r minecraft to get to the server prompt and type stop. At the bash prompt, type sudo shutdown -h now. Wait a few seconds, then unplug the Raspberry Pi.

The add a Minecraft plugin, drop the corresponding jar file in the plugins directory under the minecraft directory (/home/pi/minecraft/plugins) and restart the server (type stop in the server prompt and relaunch You can recover plugin jar files from the Internet using the wget or curl commands in a shell followed by the URL such as wget If you misplaced the jar file on the Raspberry Pi, you can move it to the right directory with the mv command: mv theplugin.jar /home/pi/minecraft/plugins. If you have the plugin jar files on your Windows PC, you can use sftp to upload them to the Raspberry Pi from your PC. There are free sftp clients such as WinSCP.

Next, you can make the server available on the Internet using a service like, and some work on your router to redirect the Minecraft port (25565) from your router to the Raspberry Pi. It is not very difficult to do but it requires you to know a few things about how to configure your router. You should also be aware of the security implications.

You can easily setup several such servers, just buy more Raspberry Pis!

Want to get your Raspberry Pi to do something different? I recommend simply switching to a different SD card containing the latest Linux distribution for Raspberry Pis. It is generally faster to start anew than to reconfigure a machine and given how inexpensive SD cards are. Don’t waste time reusing an existing card.

You may wonder why setting up a Minecraft server is so complicated. Can’t I or others just package the servers so that it is plug and play? We are limited because the copyright owners of Minecraft do want us to ship ready-to-run Minecraft servers. It should be possible, however, to largely automate the steps that I have outlined. I leave it as an exercise for the reader.

Is there any point to all of this? Probably not. Minecraft servers like Spigot are memory hungry and the Raspberry Pi has little memory. However, the project has stretched my imagination and made me think of new possibilities. I used to recycle old PCs as home servers to provide backups and caching for various projects. I got tired of having old, noisy and bulky PC in my home… but I could literally stack a cluster of Raspberry Pi computers in a shoe box. The fact that they are silent and use little power is really a blessing.

94 thoughts on “Setting up a “robust” Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi”

  1. Hi I followed your tutorial and everything seemed to install correctly. However when i tried to start the server for the first time i get the message Error: Unable to access jarfile spigot-1.9.jar can you tell me what I am need to do to correct this.

    1. Right. The command: java -jar BuildTools.jar will create a jar file, type ls spigot*.jar to find how the jar file is called, it might not be spigot-1.9.jar if you are installing a different version of spigot.

  2. Hi, thanks for your work! I do have a problem, in the next script:
    if ! screen -list | grep -q “minecraft”; then
    cd /home/pi/minecraft/1.9.2 ( i did ad a “.2”)
    while true; do
    screen -S minecraft -d -m java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.9.2.jar nogui && break ( i did ad a “.2 ” here as wel)
    it says:”no such file or directory” When i look in the minecraft folder, i don’s see a file or folder named 1.9 or 1.9.2.

    any idea’s what i am doing wrong?


  3. Err… Help..!
    Got to the pint of the start-up script and added the part to call it from ‘rc.local’.
    Re-booted the Pi , text scrolls up the screen as normal, gets to the part where it calls the script and then just prints out…
    ‘/home/pi/minecraft/ line 4: screen: command not found’ continuously.
    Any ideas what is wrong, and how do i get back into my Pi?.

  4. Ah… that sorted it. It would help if I read your instructions properly. 🙂
    The Minecraft server is working brilliantly now on my Pi3.
    Thanks for you help and a speedy response.

  5. Awesome work and thank you very much. Is it possible to have multiple worlds (survival/creative etc) with different names so that we can play together or apart and log in using different server properties or similar?

  6. When starting with the lite Raspbian image, you need to install the following additional packages: oracle-java8-jdk, git

    1. Absolutely correct! So glad I saw your comment buried in here! I don’t want to waste valuable resources for a GUI I’ll never use, so I have my Pi multi-server running on lite. Was having a terrible time getting this to work until I saw your comment. I did an apt-get remove openjdk* then apt-get install oracle-java8-jdk and BOOM! IT WORKS!

      Thank You!

      1. I don’t want to waste valuable resources for a GUI I’ll never use

        I guess you refer to disk usage. However, large SD cards are quite cheap. You can get an 8GB SD card for less than 10$.

  7. I have written your script as you have done but I get the error.

    Usage: grep [OPTION]… PATTERN [FILE]…
    Try ‘grep –help’ for more information.

    ./ 4: ./ minecraft: not found

      1. I had the script written wrong but still it didn’t work.

        When I corrected the script it ran the minecraft server but gave errors and crashed.

        I am not sure of the errors as it was going to fast to read.

      2. the CLI should be sudo grep –version

        the version I am running is 2.20

        I am not sure if it is a error with the script or if its the netatalk screen?

        I can boot the server up by itself without the script



      3. I am running the latest Raspbian Jessie (Lite) update also running the latest build of BuildTools.jar and running a raspberry pi 3.

        Not sure what else I can do to get the script to work.

        Do you think a reinstall of Netatalk might work or an older version?



        1. I recommend starting from a clean image and following the instructions carefully, step by step. They are thoroughly tested and definitively work on a Raspberry Pi 3. If you do not want to do this, you will have to find how your system is messed up.

          1. I have installed a new image and the script is not working still.

            I followed the instructions to the letter.

            If I was rude Daniel I am sorry didn’t mean to be.

  8. Thanks very much for taking the time to develop this and to write it up, by far the most thorough and clear instructions I’ve found. My kids and I got a server up and running in a few hours last weekend.
    Now that the 1.10 update has arrived, I wonder if you have any tips for going about installing the update.
    Thanks again.

    1. I’ve just done this for the first time on our little Pi2 – it can barely handle the load but it’s good enough for some father/son goofing around!

      I’m not using Spigot, I’m using the default minecraft server jar file.
      So: download the new version 1.10 server jar file from
      Put it in the same directory as your previous server file.
      Update the script by changing the filename from the old to the new file.
      I’m not sure if it will generate a new World or not – I started at 1.10 because we just today pulled the long-dormant Pi2 out of its storage.

  9. Thanks, very helpful guide. If anyone gets a TransportException or some kind of SSL error, the –disable-certificate-check flag can come in handy with BuildTools. GIT errors can be solved by clearing the working folder and starting again. Also in my case I had time to grab a coffee and two sausage rolls, head out for the afternoon, come back, write this comment and it’s still not finished on my Raspberry Pi 3.

      1. I don’t know if it’s just me, but from a Raspbian Lite image, I’ve been overrun with SSL errors. The only way to get BuildTools to start was to disable cert checking; then I had to restart the process several times to get it to complete a build and when I thought it was nearly done it went on to throw a maven plugin download transport cert error. I thought I had it, but it’s just gone and failed now.

  10. Hello Daniel, from Paris.

    I am very thankful for this step by step recipe. The only trouble i do encounter is when after launching the server, I’d like to return to the shell typing “ctrl-a d”. Doesn’t work. But I do suspect a wrong action on my side which I couldn’t figure out.

    And I was wondering if there is a way to change the parameters of the world we created from survival to creative / terrain aspect, etc.

    Thank you again.

    1. The only trouble i do encounter is when after launching the server, I’d like to return to the shell typing “ctrl-a d”.

      If you have followed my instructions, then after starting the server, you should still be in the bash shell.

      If you open a screen to access the server terminal, then, by definition, you will be in a screen session, and those can be closed by hitting “ctrl-a” then “d”.

      And I was wondering if there is a way to change the parameters of the world we created from survival to creative / terrain aspect, etc.

      Of course. You can configure the server in various ways. It is outside the scope of my blog post however.

  11. It is important to note that the directions will not work if you are using Raspi 3 with Jessie Lite.
    So far I’ve had to install several packages including java and git, change classpath etc. and I am still facing errors.
    Exception in thread “main” org.eclipse.jgit.api.errors.JGitInternalException: Exception caught during execution of reset command. {0}

  12. First I want to thank you Daniel.
    So thank you for this guide. I have raspberry pi 3 and right now it is running minecraft server so I can play it with my kids during rainy days.


  13. Is there something more efficient about the Spigot build of Minecraft over the one distributed by Mojang, allowing the former to run better on a Raspberry Pi than the latter?

    1. Most people running a server want the option of customizing it, something that Spigot makes trivial. A vanilla server would probably work well on a Raspberry Pi, but you would not be able to benefit from the Spigot ecosystem.

  14. Daniel,

    Just wanted to say thank you so much! I’m very new to linux, but not new to minecraft. Just bought a Raspberry Pi 3 and was super excited to set it up, but naturally without programming basics, I had no idea how. Thanks to you my server is now up and running. Thanks man!

  15. What’s the reason for installing Netatalk? That is a package used for sharing your stuff with Apple computers – using the RPi as an Apple (AFP) file server, Appletalk print server, etc. It does not seem at all necessary for getting Minecraft-server working.

    1. That’s correct but my instructions should work whether you have a Mac, Windows or Linux PC. If you have a Mac, netatalk simply makes the Raspberry Pi discoverable by Macs and iOS devices (iPhone). Even if you do not need it, it does no harm and it does not require any effort. It is free convenience.

  16. Daniel,

    Thank you so much for your post.

    How to uninstall BuildTools.jar (I executed the command: java -jar BuildTools.jar in my raspberry pi 2 with KODI) . I would like to install it in a new raspberry pi 3 without any other application.

    Thank you in advance.


  17. Perhaps my question is better in this way:

    How to remove the installation of server (…) by executting command: java -jar BuildTools.jar? Should I remove directories (apache-maven, BuildData, Bukkit, CraftBukkit, Spigot and work) which were created by BuildTools? Anything else?

    Thank you in advance,


  18. Great post – thank you! When setting RAMTMP=yes, the tmpfs file already includes some other parameters (commented out). Is it worth uncommenting any of these and/or modifying them? I have a Pi 2. Thanks!

    # Size limits. Please see tmpfs(5) for details on how to configure
    # tmpfs size limits.
    #LOCK_SIZE=5242880 # 5MiB

    # Mount tmpfs on /tmp if there is less than the limit size (in kiB) on
    # the root filesystem (overriding RAMTMP).

  19. I Keep getting a Connection lost error, It reads : Internal Exception: And existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host. After it boots me off the sever crashes and i need to reboot the server manually and just will crash 10-20 minutes later do you have any idea whats going on?

    1. I recommend restarting from the start, with a fresh image. Please follow the instructions carefully, step by step. They work reliably, but, unfortunately, too many people skip ahead or take liberties.

  20. Hello,

    I’ve followed everything but the server wont run with “java -Xms512M -Xmx1008M -jar spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui”. I need to add a sudo in front.

    The problem is that when I edit the file by doing:
    “sudo screen -S minecraft -d -m java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui && break”
    “screen -S minecraft -d -m sudo java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui && break”
    the server doesn’t restart when it crashes… I’ve ran out of ideas to try and fix this. Help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks in advance!

    1. I’ve followed everything but the server wont run with “java -Xms512M -Xmx1008M -jar spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui”. I need to add a sudo in front.

      Please start from a fresh image, follow the instructions exactly as they appear without taking any liberty. In particular, do not run the server as root.

  21. For a while now I have needed a script to restart a process running under screen on reboot. While it may sound simple, your script was exactly what I needed. Thanks for that!

  22. Hi, I am using your tutorial and I havent gotten very far yet, right now i am trying to make the server headless using the windows 10 bash shell (I also tried putty) but when I type the command to connect and make the raspi headless, I get this message “Connect to host rasberrypi port 22: is temporarily unavailable” Yes I did enable ssh in raspi config steps. Help please?

      1. I checked cpu load with htop, and know what the flag does from my time as a former java-developer.
        is there any good practice to benchmark a minecraft server under identical circumstances, to get robust and significant results?

        1. The main problem we face with respect to running a stable Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi is running out of resources, including memory. We want to minimize “pauses” caused by garbage collection and, ultimately, we want to reduce the risk that we will run out of memory entirely.

          If you run the server for any length of time with actual users, what you get are people who complain about latency.

          So we want a JVM optimized for low-latency.

          In this context, my question is whether the server flag will improve latency in low-memory conditions?

          No. I do not know how to benchmark it, but I am uneasy about recommending an extra flag without any supporting evidence.

  23. Very intetesting tutoriel, I found here info that I never seen.

    Quick question about Neither world, does it work ? I don’t see in your tutorial that you deactivate it.

    Thanks !

  24. Great tutorial – All though I cant get the startup script working:

    if ! screen -list | grep -q “minecraft”; then
    cd /home/minecraft
    while true; do
    screen -S minecraft -d -m java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui && break

    Yes, I’m running it as user minecraft, therefore the /home/minecraft

    If I run this command in the terminal as user minecraft in home dir, it runs great:

    screen -S minecraft -d -m java -jar -Xms512M -Xmx1008M spigot-1.10.2.jar nogui

    Any suggestion, to point me in the right direction?

      1. Hi Daniel,

        Well – the Minecraft server don´t start with the startup script.

        minecraft@pi:~$ ./

        No errors, it just don´t start

        The file has permission 755

        / Dennis

      2. Hi Daniel,

        Well – the Minecraft server don´t start with the startup script.

        minecraft@pi:~$ ./

        No errors, it just don´t start

        The file has permission 755

  25. greetings, from the netherlands. Im installing minecraft server for my kids, but do not know anything about the game 😉
    Installed the full raspian version in pi3 and followed your instructions. The server starts up and runs. The minecraft server is found in the minecraft client (on LAN). but cannot connect because of authentication failure. Internet search suggest disabling online-mode. Then the client can connect.
    Any idea what the issue with the authentication ? Is it a problem is the online-mode stays disabled ?

  26. My kid and I followed the instructions, except the netatalk installation as this is only for Apple. And we did do the automated starting of the server at reboot. My kid uses a different user than pi, and he did the whole instructions with this user. We made the script and it worked. But once we adapted the RAMTMP setting and rebooted, we could not run the script anymore. It says: “could not find” while we are in the folder containing the script, and where the jar file is. If we just start the command itself for the server, it works fine. We did do the chmod action.

    1. My instructions assume that the user is “pi”. You can still make it work if you take liberties and change your user name, but you then need to adapt the instructions accordingly.

      I recommend that you follow the instructions as-is.

      1. Thought so. Just bought additional sd cards, so we can try again. Keep you posted. Just thought it was weird that it worked before the reboot.

  27. How do you go about adding mods? tried doing a google search but was not able to find anything that was a straight, cut and dry step by step detailed list of instructions.

  28. hello daniel i thank you very match for the minecraft server.
    everything is working. even

    Ferry a son of Marc

  29. Excellent tutorial.
    Went exactly as planned.

    This is probably the first ever tutorial that actually worked exactly as explained.
    Well done and thank you.

  30. So i have the problem ./> line 4> screen> sommand not found and also when i type screen in console it says command not found. any suggestions

  31. Thanks Daniel… Works like a charm…
    Now to find tutorials to make our own mods for the server. Since this is a server, I don’t suppose we can easily create custom mobs for the game? The client will need to know how the mobs work and the custom textures too…

  32. Thanks for the tutorial Daniel. It’s working for me as well.

    And i’m still running in graphic mode. Also running an Apache webserver. And changed my hostname. The server runs well for me.

    A small thing, as a Raspberry Pi and Linux beginner, i had it little difficult with:
    Install a couple of extra packages: sudo apt-get install netatalk screen. Do not skip this important step as we need screen. (The netatalk package is only needed if you have a Mac. In such cases, the netatalk allows your Mac to interact with the Pi more easily on the network.)
    I luckily find out, if you do not have a Mac, you still have to run: sudo apt-get install screen.

    To make the server accessible from the internet. You have to forward 25565 in your router to your local Raspberry-Pi IP address.

    It’s easy if you know some of routers, but if not, it’s difficult to do. Since every home router isn’t the same and Port Forward settings could be in an different place or naming.

    I later found this site: (when searching for RealVNC ports).

    1. I luckily find out, if you do not have a Mac, you still have to run: sudo apt-get install screen.

      My recommendation is to run sudo apt-get install netatalk screen as made clear by the following comment (Do not skip this important step as we need screen.). For some reason, people seem to object to having to install netatalk. I don’t understand why. But if you do object, then sure, type sudo apt-get install screen.

      1. I did not know netatalk and screen are two different applications. Also not knowing you can install mutiple applications in one line.

        For a complete beginner, i would write it as: sudo apt-get install screen. And a second line sudo apt-get install netatalk.

        So i think that is way some people think it’s everything or nothing. And maybe they miss installing screen, because they don’t have a Mac.

        1. I tell people to type sudo apt-get install netatalk screen. I then tell not to skip this important step.

          If one decides to skip the command… I am not exactly sure what else I can do.

  33. Hello. I greatly appreciate this post. Which leads me to my next question… I haven’t played since 1.3.2 (minecraft) and want to host a modded server for myself and some friends. I mention my experience with the older version because I don’t know
    1) how to mod a server
    2) I’ve modded older clients
    3) is it a similar process?
    Thanks in advance, as I can’t seem to find anything on this elsewhere.

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