Science and Technology links (July 15th, 2018)

  1. The majority of people dying are 80 years old or older.
  2. A heart-disease drug can partially reverse type 1 diabetes.
  3. We can at least partially reverse age-related immune-system decline using drugs.
  4. Senescent cells are old cells that refuse to die; they are behind several age-related diseases. We know how to clear them, at least in part. If we inject even few senescent cells in mice, they suffer. Clearing the senescent cells afterward rescues the mice.
  5. Omega 3 supplements are probably a good idea if you suffer from type 1 diabetes.
  6. The price of commercially-available computing power has come down about 7x in just four years.
  7. Less prestigious institutions receive less research funding but are better on a per-dollar basis. Effectively, we overrate prestigious institutions and should look at the good work from less prestigious places if we want to maximize productivity.

Published by

Daniel Lemire

A computer science professor at the Université du Québec (TELUQ).

3 thoughts on “Science and Technology links (July 15th, 2018)”

  1. Intermittent fasting helps with diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity and might even help senescence:

    Neuroprotective role of intermittent fasting in senescence-accelerated mice P8

  2. As to (1), the numbers are for just England and Wales. To normalize the chart, we would need to know the relative number of folk in each bucket. Put differently, are there a lot of old folk in that area?

    Also the size in age is different for each bucket. All the brackets are five years, except the 80+ bracket. Skews the result?

    It is worth knowing the absolute numbers, perhaps for setting regional policy. As a selfish individual, I want a normalized number. In particular, what are the odds of dying per individual per year, for each of the brackets.

    Of course then I would like to know how those absolute and normalized numbers vary from one region to another, and how they vary across time.

    Easy to get mislead into dubious conclusions.

    1. As to (1), the numbers are for just England and Wales. To normalize the chart, we would need to know the relative number of folk in each bucket. Put differently, are there a lot of old folk in that area?

      England and Wales is a vast region. Millions and millions of folks. The age distributions are available, but they are not, to my knowledge, particularly intriguing.

      The United States has a younger population and a higher death rate, so the same exact result might not hold across all of the USA, but you can bet good money that it holds over specific regions (e.g., many states).

      As a selfish individual, I want a normalized number. In particular, what are the odds of dying per individual per year, for each of the brackets.

      We know what the curve looks like.

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