Science and Technology links (February 16th, 2018)

In all countries, in all years–without exception–girls did better than boys in academic performance (PISA) tests. Vinod Khosla said: There are, perhaps, a few hundred sensors in the typical car and none in the body. A single ad shown to you on Facebook has way more computing power applied to it than a $10,000 medical … Continue reading Science and Technology links (February 16th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (February 9th, 2018)

We shed 50 million skin cells every day. A mutant crayfish reproduces by cloning. To my knowledge, this might be the largest animal to reproduce by cloning. Before about 25 years ago, the species simply did not exist (…) it has spread across much of Europe and gained a toehold on other continents. In Madagascar, … Continue reading Science and Technology links (February 9th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (February 2nd, 2018)

Most mammals, including human beings, age according to a Gompertz curve. It is a fancy way of saying that your risk of death goes up exponential with age. Naked mole rats are mammals that do not age, in the following sense: unlike all other mammals studied to date, and regardless of sex or breeding-status, the … Continue reading Science and Technology links (February 2nd, 2018)

Science and Technology links (January 26th, 2018)

We have reached “peak coal” meaning that coal usage is going to diminish in the coming years. McGill professor Ishiang Shih has been accused by the US government of leaking chip designs to the Chinese government. The professor runs a business called JYS Technologies. This sounds impressive and mysterious until you check out the company … Continue reading Science and Technology links (January 26th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (January 19th, 2018)

The Raspberry Pi 3, a $15-dollar computer that I use for various fun projects, is 15 times more powerful than the Cray-1 supercomputer, but it is 130,000 times lighter. The Cray-1 was worth $9 million in 1977. (Source: Joe Armstrong‏) Stem cells can be used to replace or modify the behavior of our own cells. … Continue reading Science and Technology links (January 19th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (January 12th, 2018)

A few years ago, researchers in Danemark expressed concerns regarding high concentrations of pesticides that are showing up in urine samples of Danish mothers and children. Last time I was in Danemark, a newspaper was reporting that there are surprising amounts of pesticides in the products sold in Danemark. A recent research article found that … Continue reading Science and Technology links (January 12th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (January 5th, 2018)

Regarding solar energy, Tyler Cowen writes: There is now a doctrine of what I call “solar triumphalism”: the price of panels has been falling exponentially, the technology makes good practical sense, and only a few further nudges are needed for solar to become a major energy source. Unfortunately, this view seems to be wrong. Laura … Continue reading Science and Technology links (January 5th, 2018)

Science and Technology links (December 29th, 2017)

It is often believed that, in the developed world, more land is used to host human beings as time goes by, reducing space for forest and wildlife. That is not true: Forests are spreading in almost all Western countries, with the fastest growth in places that historically had rather few trees. In 1990 28% of … Continue reading Science and Technology links (December 29th, 2017)

Science and Technology links (December 22nd, 2017)

Bitcoins are electronic records that are meant to be used as currency. They have become increasingly popular and expensive. Reportedly, the famous investment bank Goldman Sachs is planning to offer bitcoin financial services in the summer of 2018. Doing away with television and switching to subscription services like Netflix reduces your exposure to ads. So … Continue reading Science and Technology links (December 22nd, 2017)

Science and Technology links (December 15th, 2017)

Scientists found a human gene which, when inserted into mice, makes their brain grow larger. David Brin has a series of classical sci-fi books where we “uplift” animals so that they become as smart as we are. Coincidence? I think not. Should we be more willing to accept new medical therapies? Are we too cautious? … Continue reading Science and Technology links (December 15th, 2017)